Food Supply and Rationing

Annie Pascoe of Woking promises to eat less and waste nothing, 1917 SHC ref 6932/7/3/11

Annie Pascoe of Woking promises to eat less and waste nothing, 1917
SHC ref 6932/7/3/11

Despite efforts to increase food production, consumers were confronted with shortages which grew increasingly severe as the war dragged on (though far less severe than those affecting German and Austro-Hungary). Milk, grain and sugar were all in short supply and prices rose relentlessly.

A poem circulating at the time captures the popular mood:

‘My Tuesdays are meatless
My Wednesdays are wheatless
I am getting more eatless each day
My stove it is heatless
My bed it is sheetless
They’re all sent to the YMCA
The bar rooms are treatless
My coffee is sweetless
Each day I get poorer and wiser
My stockings are feetless
My trousers are seatless
My! How I do hate the Kaiser.

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