Geoffrey Cather VC

Geoffrey Cather VC

Title: Geoffrey Cather VC
Description: Courtesy of Limpsfield Chart Golf Club by-nc

Text and research by Limpsfield Chart Golf Club

Geoffrey St George Shillington Cather was born in October 1890, the elder son of Robert and Margaret Cather.  Robert was a partner in Jospeh Tetley and Co, tea merchants in Fenchurch Street, London.  The family moved to Limpsfield sometime in the 1890s, and lived in Red Roofs, Bluehouse Lane.  He went to Hazelwood School in 1900 and then to Rugby School, which he left in 1908.  He was a member of the Limpsfield Chart Golf Club.

Geoffrey Cater followed his father and joined Tetley’s in London in 1908 as a tea buyer’s assistant.  He worked for them for a time in the USA and Canada before returning to England in 1914.  While in London, Cather had served in the Territorials.  When war broke out, he enlisted in the Royal Fusiliers but then chose to go back to his Ulster roots, so he was commissioned in May 1915 in the 9th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers.

On 1 July 1916, the opening day of the Somme battle, Cather’s battalion was part of the 36th Ulster Division’s assault on Thiepval Ridge.  The first wave left the trenches at zero hour but came under intense machine gun fire, which also decimated the following waves.  By nightfall nine officers and 235 men had been killed or wounded.

Cather, the battalion adjutant, did not take part in the initial assault but could hear the cries of the wounded out in no man’s land and near the German wire.  As evening fell he filled some water bottles and crawled out to help them, dragging or carrying many of the wounded to where the stretcher bearers could pick them up.  There was heavy German artillery and machine gun fire throughout the four hours in which he was carrying out this work.  The next morning he went out again in full view of the enemy trenches to help more of the wounded in no man’s land until he was killed by machine gun fire.  His Victoria Cross was gazetted in September 1916, the citation stressing ‘his conspicuous bravery and self-sacrifice’.  Cather’s body disappeared in the carnage on Thiepval Ridge, but he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

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