Cecil Herbert Langridge

Family story contributed by Brian Gudgeon

Cecil Herbert Langridge was born on 8 November 1894, to Sydney John Langridge and Lizzie Langridge (nee Saker), in Croydon.  By 1901, the family had moved to the High Street, Colliers Wood, at Sydney Langridge’s general store.  Ten years later, at the time of the 1911 Census, Cecil and his widowed mother (together with the rest of the family) were living at 31 Carmichael Road, South Norwood; Cecil was listed as working as an Engineer’s Assistant (Screw Maker) for an Optical Instrument Makers.

Cecil Langridge’s record on the Roll of Individuals entitled to the British War Medal; he is listed as serving with the Military Police. Courtesy of Brian Gudgeon.

He has two entries under the First World War Service Medal and Award Rolls:
1. Dated 1914: Cecil is listed as a Gunner for the 18th Divisional Ammunition Column and Ammunition Park, Royal Garrison Artillery; service number 40932.
2. Dated 1914-1920. Cecil had risen to the ranks of Lance Corporal, and was now serving with the Foot Branch of the Military Police.

After the war, Cecil married Elsie Hinds, in early 1922 in Southwark.  At the time of the 1939 Register, his listed as working as a Scientific Instrument maker, with the couple living at 46 Violet Lane, Croydon.  He died aged 75.

Read the stories of his brothers here:

Horace Leonard Langridge: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/horace-leonard-langridge/

Sidney Harold Langridge: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/sidney-harold-langridge/

Horace Leonard Langridge

Family story contributed by Brian Gudgeon

Horace Leonard Langridge was born on 3 November 1892, to Sydney John Langridge and Lizzie Langridge (nee Saker), in Croydon.  In the Surrey Church of England Baptism records for 1813-1912, Horace’s baptism took place at St Luke’s Church, Woodside, Croydon on 5 February 1893; his father is listed as working as a Railway Clerk, with the family living at 3 The Oval, Croydon.  By 1901, the family had moved to the High Street, Colliers Wood, at Sydney Langridge’s general store.  Ten years later, at the time of the 1911 Census, Horace and his widowed mother were living at 31 Carmichael Road, South Norwood; Horace was listed as working as a Clerk in a General Coal Merchant’s store.

Horace Langridge Army Attestation Papers. Courtesy of Brian Gudgeon.

During the First World War, Horace served as a Gunner in the London Brigade (Heavy Battery), Royal Garrison Artillery.  Nothing else is known about his wartime service, as his papers were among the many destroyed in the London Blitz of the Second World War.

The wedding of Horace Langridge to Ethel Day, 23 July 1921. Courtesy of Brian Gudgeon

He survived the war, and married Ethel Day on 23 July 1921, at St Saviour’s Church, Croydon.  The couple lived at 12 Torridge Road, Croydon, at the time of the 1939 Register.  He died on 24 January 1984, when he had been living at Longmead House, Buxton Lane, Caterham, aged 92.

 

 

Read the stories of his brothers here:

Cecil Herbert Langridge: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/cecil-herbert-langridge/

Sidney Harold Langridge: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/sidney-harold-langridge/

Norman Frank Andrews

Family story contributed by Brian Gudgeon

Norman Frank Andrews was born in June 1898, to Leonard Frank Andrews and Annie Andrews (nee Chitty), on the Isle of Wight.  The family had moved to Russ Hill Road Cottage Charlwood, Surrey, by the time of the 1901 Census, later moving to Russ Hill Farm.

He enlisted at Horsham in February 1917, aged 18, with ‘D’ Battery, 52nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, serving as a Gunner.  After a few months of training, he was sent to France, where he was killed in action a year later in September 1918.  An obituary appeared in the Surrey Mirror & County Post on 27 September 1918:

Report on Norman Andrews’ death, as reported in the Surrey Mirror, 27 September 1918

News has reached Mr and Mrs L F Andrews, of Russ Hill Farm, Charlwood, that their only son, Gunner Norman Frank Andrews, of the Royal Field Artillery, has fallen in action during the recent advance on the Western front.  It appears that he was standing with his section officer and several of his comrades when a shell burst right by them, a fragment striking Norman Andrews on the head, killing him instantaneously.  His section officer and the others were all wounded.  Deceased, who was 20 years of age last June, joined up for military service in February 1917; was drafted out to France in September of last year; was killed on [3 September*] 1918.  The burial took place in the little cemetery behind the lines.  An officer, writing to his sorrowing parents, says: “I have known your son ever since he joined the battery and can truthfully say that he was one of the most efficient gunners we had.  He always did his duty well and faithfully, and as a man was popular both with officers and men,  His loss will be felt by all who knew him.

*Actually 5 September 1918

Norman’s friends also wrote  to express their sorrow at his death; the refer to his buoyancy of spirit, his friendliness, and willingness to help at all times.  He had many friends in Charlwood, his bright, cheery disposition making him a general favourite in all circles.  He is buried in Vis-En-Artois British Cemetery, Haucourt, France, and is commemorated on the war memorial at St Nicholas Church, Charlwood, and on the Roll of Honour in the church.

Norman Andrews’ Grave Report on the Graves Registration Report Form

Alfred Wilton Day

Family story contributed by Brian Gudgeon

Alfred Wilton Day was born on 17 December 1883 to Alfred John Day and Alice Louisa Day (nee Gaunt), in Southwark.  By the time of the 1901 Census, the family had moved to Croydon, and Alfred had enlisted with the 2nd Battalion, East Surrey Regiment.  He was soon involved in military action after being sent to fight in the last few months of the Boer War.  Alfred is listed on the UK Military Campaign Medal and Award Rolls 1793-1949: Campaign of Service South Africa – Second Boer War, Service Date 1899-1902.  He remained with the East Surrey Regiment, seeing service in Poona [now Pune], India, between 1906 and 1909.  In 1913, only a year before the outbreak of the First World War, after rising to the rank of Corporal, Alfred was discharged from the 3rd Battalion, East Surrey Regiment.

Alfred Day with fellow Non-Commissioned Officers of the East Surrey Regiment, 1914. Courtesy Brian Gudgeon.

Alfred must have re-joined his old regiment soon after war was declared in 1914, as in 1915 his sister Alice Florence (Flo) received a Christmas card from him, showing that he was now serving with the 10th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment.  He seems to have been transferred to various different regiments throughout the war: the Middlesex Regiment, the Labour Corps, and the King’s Royal Rifle Corps.  On 16 March 1919, Alfred was Mentioned in Despatches for ‘Gallant and Distinguished services in the Field’ – a brave chap! He ended the war as Regimental Sergeant Major.

Alfred Day (without his false teeth in!) and his daughter, Lily, in 1929. Courtesy of Brian Gudgeon.

He married Mary Amelia Hodge (always known as “Millie”) after the war, in the winter of 1920, and worked as a baker’s roundsman.  Alfred died on 1 November 1933, the same year as his brother William (they were buried in the same plot at Mitcham Road Cemetery).  His Death Certificate states that he died in Teevan Road, Croydon, but had been living at 57 Elmers Road, South Norwood.  The cause of death was attributed to ‘fibrosis of the heart’ (which is most likely as a result of his years of heavy smoking).

Read about his brothers in the First World War:

Arthur Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/arthur-day/

Herbert Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/herbert-day/

Fred Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/fred-day/

Sydney Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/sydney-frederick-day/

Walter Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/walter-daniel-day/

William Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/william-day/

William Day

Family story contributed by Brian Gudgeon

William Day was born in the winter of 1880, to Alfred Jon Day and Alice Louisa Day (nee Gaunt), in Southwark.  By the 1901 Census, the Day family were living at 10 Rosebery Avenue, Croydon, and the 21 year old William was working as a Bottler in a brewery.

William Day 1902 Attestation Papers. Courtesy of Brian Gudgeon.

His military career began on 13 January 1902, when he enlisted with the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment (QRWS), in Croydon, serving as a regular in the 1st Battalion.  His time with the QRWS took him to South Africa and India, from where he posted Christmas cards to his sister Alice Florence (Flo) Day; a card dated from 1905 shows he was stationed in Sialkot, in the Punjab region (now in Pakistan, after the Partition in 1947).  By 1911, he was working as General Warehouseman Dry Goods, and living with parents at 116 Birchanger Road, South Norwood. The family is not sure why he is entered thus as according to his Military records he was in the army at this time. It may be because he was transferred to Army Reserve on 28 Feb 1910 (or maybe April) and then re-engaged 23 Feb 1911, and then transferred again 23 Feb 1912. He was finally discharged on 12th January 1914 having served 12 years.

Although no records of his First World War service (apart from Medal Card) has been found to date, he would likely have been called up or volunteered, upon outbreak of war. In 1917, he is listed as serving with the Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own) in a Christmas card to ‘Flo and Ed’ (his sister and her husband Charles Edward Mitchell).
In a 1918 ‘Menu’ to [Signaller] Day W.’ he is shown as serving in the 3rd Battalion, Rifle Brigade.

William Day Death Certificate. Courtesy of Brian Gudgeon.

William survived the war, and died in 1933; he was interred in Mitcham Road Cemetery, Croydon, Plot W4, Grave No. 17716, with his younger brother, Alfred Wilton. William’s death certificate says he was ‘Found dead on 26th March 1933 Holt Wood, Chelsham R.D.’ He was 52. The cause of death was ‘Suicide whilst of unsound mind by lysol poisoning. [Post Mortem] Certificate received from E. Lovell Hewitt Acting Coroner for County of Surrey. Inquest held 30th March 1933.’ His address and occupation were ‘7 Drummond Road Croydon. No occupation. Formerly a Window Cleaner’.

Read the stories of his brothers in the First World War:

Alfred Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/alfred-wilton-day/

Arthur Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/arthur-day/

Fred Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/fred-day/

Herbert Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/herbert-day/

Sydney Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/sydney-frederick-day/

Walter Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/walter-daniel-day/

Arthur Henry Day

Family story contributed by Brian Gudgeon

Arthur Day was born on 12 April 1882, to Alfred John Day and Alice Louisa Day (nee Gaunt), in Lambeth.  By 1891, aged 7, he was a scholar, living with his parents at 97 Kimberley Road, Camberwell.  By the 1911 Census, aged 27 and single, Printer’s Machinist, living with parents at 116 Birchanger Road, South Norwood.

Arthur Day’s Silver War Service Badge Record. Courtesy of Brian Gudgeon

He enlisted as a Private with the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment (service number 14721) on 8 November 1914.  He was wounded and awarded the Silver War Badge No. 13220, which states he enlisted 7 December 1915 and was discharged 10 March 1919.  His Service Medal and Awards Roll entry states that he ended the was as a Corporal.

He married Alice Victoria Dives, a war widow, in 1924, and the couple were registered as living at 29 Luna Road, Croydon, in the 1939 Register. He died in 1969, aged 87.

Read the stories of his brothers in the First World War:

Alfred Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/alfred-wilton-day/

Fred Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/fred-day/

Herbert Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/herbert-day/

Sydney Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/sydney-frederick-day/

Walter Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/walter-daniel-day/

William Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/william-day/

Herbert Day

Family story contributed by Brian Day

Herbert Day was born on 11 June 1887, to Alfred John Day and Alice Louisa Day (nee Gaunt), in Nunhead (now in the London Borough of Southwark).

Herbert Day’s Medal Roll Index Card. Courtesy of Brian Gudgeon.

In 1911, aged 23 and single, his was a Private in 1st Battalion, the Welch Regiment, based at the Main Barracks, Allessia, Cairo, Egypt. The Regiment were in Alexandria, Egypt, between December 1909 and February 1912. His First World War Medal Roll Index Card states he was a Private in 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, with the service number 9561; then, with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers (number 34212), before going back to the Welsh Regiment (number 68919). His entry into war was 13 Aug 1914, indicating he was a regular. He was transferred 11 Aug 1915, but it does not state where. He received the 1914 Star, Victory and British medals.

He married Beatrice Hayes on 5 Jun 1920, in Croydon, and was listed as working as a Labourer. They lived at 123 Burlington Road, Thornton Heath, the same given for his wife.  By 1939, the couple were living at 123 Burlington Road, Croydon, with Herbert working as a carpenter.

He died in 1954, aged 67.

Alfred Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/alfred-wilton-day/

Arthur Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/arthur-day/

Fred Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/fred-day/

Sydney Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/sydney-frederick-day/

Walter Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/walter-daniel-day/

William Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/william-day/

Walter Daniel Day

Family story contributed by Brian Gudgeon

Walter Daniel Day was born in the spring of 1890, to Alfred John Day and Alice Louisa Day (nee Gaunt), in Nunhead (now in the London Borough of Southwark).  The family had moved to Croydon by the time of the 1901 Census.

Walter Day’s 1902 Attestation Papers. Courtesy of Brian Gudgeon

He enlisted in the colours on 8 March 1909, at Croydon, aged 19, joining the 4th Battalion, the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment for a 4 year engagement (no. 1760).  In the 1911 Census, he is shown working as a General Clerk (Fish Merchant), living at parents home, 116 Birchanger Road, South Norwood. The family is not sure as to how he was in the army and registered in the Census as at home, [but, one explanation could be that he was home on leave at the time, and simply recorded as being at that address on the day the Census was taken]. He re-engaged on 8 March 1914 and 8 March 1915. He transferred to 1st London Division, Signal Company, Royal Engineers, as a Lance Corporal, on 28 August 1914. On 15 April 1916, after serving 7 years and 39 days, he was discharged upon ‘Termination of Engagement’. He was 26.

He married Nellie Maille on 17 May 1916; they lived at 147 Portland Road, South Norwood. On 10 June 1916 he re-enlisted as a Rifleman in the Royal Irish Rifles (no. 44720) and went to France on 31 January 1917. He was reported missing on 26 March 1918, presumed killed.

His son, Ronald Walter, was born early in 1917. Whether Walter saw his son before he embarked for France, is unknown. No further details have been found about Ronald. His mother didn’t remarry and one wonders if he was ‘adopted’ elsewhere in the family or with family friends. Walter’s death obviously had a devastating effect on his family. His sister, Alice Florence (Brian’s maternal grandmother), told her daughter Iris (Brian’s mother), he was a most handsome man and his loss was deeply felt by the family and his brothers, William, Arthur, Alfred, Herbert, Sydney and Fred, who all served in and survived the Great War.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission entry states: ‘44720 Rifleman Walter Daniel Day, Royal Irish Rifles, 11th/13th Batallion, attached to 22nd Entrenching Battalion* died 27 March 1918. He is commemorated on Pozieres Memorial, France, panel 74 to 76’ (actually panel 75). The Memorial commemorates over 14,000 casualties who have no known grave and died on the Somme from 21 March to 7 August 1918.

*22nd Entrenching Battalion was formed in early February 1918. Officers and men arrived from the 11/13th Royal Irish Rifles, making an ‘extremely strong and well-equipped unit’, according to one of its officers. Another officer reports the battalion never actually used the title 22nd Entrenching Battalion. The battalion was at first positioned at Essigny and Grugiers, both in the area of the 36th (Ulster) Division south of Saint Quentin but moved to Douchy on 11th February. There it worked on cable trenches. The battalion then moved on 17th February to Misery, an aptly named village between Chaulnes and Peronne. Working parties were sent to Marchelepot, Brie and Villers-Carbonell, where the battalion was put to work under Canadian Railway Engineers. Unfortunately during this period the battalion had its Lewis guns taken away. It was involved in the fighting against the German spring offensive, being ordered early on 24th March to move to Guillancourt and dig a defensive line from Rainecout to Rosieres (Wally died on 27th). The left hand company then took part in a counter attack at Framerville. The battalion CO, Lieutenant Colonel Philip Blair-Oliphant, died of wounds on 8th April, a result of injuries he sustained in this action. In the withdrawal that followed, the battalion ended up near Hangard with its right flank next to a French unit. – this information courtesy www.1914-1918.net

Read the stories of his brothers here:

Alfred Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/alfred-wilton-day/

Arthur Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/arthur-day/

Fred Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/fred-day/

Herbert Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/herbert-day/

Sydney Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/sydney-frederick-day/

William Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/william-day/

Sydney Frederick Day

Family story contributed by Brian Gudgeon

Sydney Frederick Day was born on 2 August 1892, to Alfred John Day and Alice Louisa Day (nee Gaunt), in Nunhead (now in the London Borough of Southwark).  By the time of the 1901 Census, the Day family was living in Thornton Heath, Croydon.  Before the outbreak of war in 1914, Sydney had been working as a Bar Assistant, living at 65 Clapham Park Road.

Sydney Day’s Medal Roll Index Card. Courtesy of Brian Gudgeon.

In 1914, Sydney enlisted with the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment (QRWS), serving as a Private, with the service number 200583.  He seems to have done well in the Army, as his Character Certificate describes him as ‘very good’.  The family recall Sydney telling them that he received shrapnel wounds to his upper body, during his service; many years after the war, a small piece came out of his big toe!  He continued to serve with the QRWS until the end of the war, when he was finally discharged at Hounslow on 31 March 1920.

Shortly after the end of the war, Sydney married Edith Collier in Croydon, on 4 January 1922.  The marriage was not a success, and the couple divorced.  Sydney remarried in the spring on 1935, this time to Dorothy Cox; they spent most of their married life at 121 Frant Road, Thornton Heath, with Sydney working as a jobbing gardener (as recorded in the 1939 Register).

Sydney died in 1969, aged 77.  The family remember him as a nice, quiet, gentle man, who kept two highly polished brass shell cases on his mantelpiece, mementoes of the war.

Read the stories of his brothers during the war:

Alfred Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/alfred-wilton-day/

Arthur Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/arthur-day/

Fred Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/fred-day/

Herbert Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/herbert-day/

Walter Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/walter-daniel-day/

William Day: https://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/william-day/

Lieutenant Reginald Courtenay Hulton Woodhouse

A career soldier, Reginald was the only son of R.I. Woodhouse (rector of Merstham) and Mrs Woodhouse.  Born in 1890, he was a career soldier and was 25 at the time of his death in action on 13-14 January, 1916.

Born at St Luke’s Vicarage, Bromley Compton in Kent in 1890, Reginald attended Eton between 1904-1909, where he achieved recognition for his academic ability. Following on from school, he was an undergraduate at University College, Oxford. Whilst at university, Reginald joined the Officer Training Corps. There, his potential was realised and he secured the highest marks in his year for entry into the army as an officer.  As a result, he was allowed free choice of the unit to which he wished to be attached and straight after graduation, he obtained a commission, opting to join the Indian Army.  Following the outbreak of World War I, he was transferred from the 83rd Battalion Wallja-ahbad Light Infantry to the 56th Battalion Punjabi Rifles. During 1914-16, Reginald was serving with the 1st Battalion of the 56th Punjabi Rifles. His regiment was attached to the 28th Indian Brigade. This was part of one of seven Indian expeditionary forces despatched overseas (Indian Expeditionary Force F), and had been assigned the defence of the vital imperial artery, the Suez Canal. In December 1915,  Reginald’s unit was transferred to Mesopotamia and was involved in the unsuccessful attempts to relieve the British and Indian garrison at Kut, which was besieged by the Turks from 7 December 1915 through to 29 April 1916.  The Indian Army, which was the largest of the British Imperial and Commonwealth forces was, throughout the conflict, made up entirely of volunteers. Of the  one million Indian servicemen who served overseas during that conflict, 700 000 were sent to Mesopotamia.

In what has been described as ‘the worst defeat of the allies in World War One’, among the captured at Kut were six generals. Reginald was killed in the early stages of the campaign at Kut-Al-Amara (Iraq). His body was not in a named grave; as a result he appears on the CWGC memorial at Basra (panel 56) in Iraq.

 

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Dorking and Leatherhead Advertiser  22/01/1916, p. 5; ‘KILLED IN ACTION’.

The Siege of Kut

Officer Training Corps     The origins of the OTC were in the pre-war army reforms introduced by the Secretary of War, Lord Haldane in 1906. It was designed to solve a recruitment shortage of trained officers for the  reserves.  Courtenay served first with the Shropshire Light Infantry based at Secunderabad before taking up a commission with the 83rd Wallaj-ahbad Light Infantry.